Alcohol

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Barolo

Barolo is a red wine produced in the region of Piedmont in northern Italy. It is made from the Nebbiolo grape and is often described as one of Italy’s greatest wines. Production codes dictate that vineyards must be located on hillsides situated in sufficient sunlight. Barolo is often described as having the aromas of tar and roses, like most Nebbiolo based wines it is known for its light color and lack of opacity. Barolo ages well and takes on a rust red tinge as it matures.

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Beaujolais

Beaujolais is a french AOC wine that is usually made from the fermented Gamay grape which has a thin skin and is low in tannins. Beaujolais tends to be a very light-bodied red wine with relatively high amounts of acidity; it peaked in popularity in the 1980’s. The region was first cultivated for wine by the Romans and although administratively Beaujolais part of the Burgundy wine region, the climate of the region is closer to that of the Rhône.

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Bordeaux

Bordeaux can refer to any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Centred on the city of Bordeaux and covering the whole of the Gironde department, Bordeaux is the largest wine growing region in France. More often than not the term Bordeaux refers to red wine as over 80% of the wine produced in the region is red. The remainder of the wines produced are sweet white wines (most notably Sauternes), dry whites, and (in much smaller quantities) rosé and sparkling wines (Crémant de Bordeaux).

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British Wine

British Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from British fermented grapes. Due to the natural composition of the grapes, they ferment without the addition of sugars or other chemicals. Wine can be served as an accompaniment to many traditional dishes but is also added to enhance the flavour of food in sauces, meat dishes and desserts.

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Burgundy

Burgundy wine is wine made in the Burgundy region in eastern France, in the valleys and slopes west of the Saône River, a tributary of the Rhône. The most famous wines produced here—those commonly referred to as “Burgundies”—are dry red wines made from Pinot noir grapes and white wines made from Chardonnay grapes. Small amounts of rosé and sparkling wines are also produced in the region.

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Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the world’s most widely recognized red wine grape varieties. It is grown in nearly every major wine producing country. The classic profile of Cabernet Sauvignon tends to be full-bodied wines with high tannins and noticeable acidity that contributes to the wine’s aging potential. In cooler climates, Cabernet Sauvignon tends to produce wines with blackcurrant notes that can be accompanied by green bell pepper notes, mint and cedar which will all become more pronounced as the wine ages.

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Chablis

The Chablis AOC area is the northernmost wine district of the Burgundy region in France. The grapevines around the town of Chablis are almost all Chardonnay, making a dry white wine renowned for the purity of its aroma and taste. The cool climate and heavy clay and chalk soils of this region produces a flinty refined Chardonnay that is much prized for its intense mineral taste. It is sometimes described as “goût de pierre à fusil” (“tasting of gunflint”), and sometimes as “steely”. To focus on the fruit and mineral flavours most wines in Chablis are unwoodedand and vinified in stainless steel tanks.

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Champagne

Champagne is a sparkling wine produced from grapes grown in the Champagne AOC region of France. Champagne producers have to adhere to specific production rules; the secondary fermentation of the wine happens in the bottle, this creates carbonation and the characteristic bubbles in Champagne. Some use the term Champagne as a generic term for sparkling wine, but in most countries, it is illegal to officially label any product Champagne unless it both comes from the Champagne region and is produced under the rules of the appellation.

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Chardonnay

Chardonnay is a green-skinned grape variety used to make white wine. It originated in the Burgundy wine region of eastern France but is now grown wherever wine is produced, from England to New Zealand. The Chardonnay grape itself is very neutral, with many of the flavors commonly associated with the grape being derived from such influences as terroir (from the french terre meaning land) and oak. Chardonnay is an important component of many sparkling wines around the world, including Champagne.

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Chianti

Chianti is any wine produced in the Chianti region, in central Tuscany, Italy. It was historically associated with a squat bottle enclosed in a straw basket, called a fiasco meaning flask. The fiasco is only used by a few makers of the wine now – most Chianti is now bottled in more standard shaped wine bottles. Baron Bettino Ricasoli (later Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Italy) created the classic Chianti recipe of 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo and 15% Malvasia bianca in the middle of the nineteenth century, however blends of grapes can vary throughout the region.

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